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Posts Tagged ‘generations’

Grandpa and Grandma Shaw with Ross and Jean Shaw, 2008.

Grandpa and Grandma Shaw (standing) with Ross and Jean Shaw (seated), 2008.

No matter how many questions I have asked, I am haunted by those that I wasn’t brave enough to voice. Or worse yet, the questions I didn’t make the time to ask.

And all of a sudden I am too late.  My opportunity lost, forever.

I recently learned about the passing of my grandfather’s second cousin, Ross Shaw.  I had spoken with Ross and his wife Jean on a couple of occasions, but, silly me, I always thought I would have the chance to ask the most important questions at a later date.   (more…)

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In 2007 I began to record the stories and histories that have been shared with me in a little brown book that is safely stowed on my bedside table. As of late, I haven’t been as prudent about filling its crisp, blank pages with recently gleaned stories; however, knowing that the journal exists comforts me, and diminishes the guilt I should feel.

For many months I thought and talked about putting pen to paper, and then I finally committed to recording everything I could remember from conversations with family members over tea and cookies, and of course homemade pie.  The result is a handwritten compilation of voices and personalities from all sides of my family, as well as the occasional family acquaintance and friend.  (more…)

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Norman Shaw and son, Ian.

I was recently struck by a truth that I have contemplated, but never truly considered in a formal and serious manner.  While attending a lecture in Collingwood, the evening’s speaker made a simple deduction that left me searching for a pen and paper.

The Watts family of Collingwood ventured to Canada from Ireland and began a boatbuilding business that became internationally renowned.  Seventy years after arriving in Collingwood, the Watts family was still building and shipping custom-made wooden boats across Canada and into the United States.

The speaker’s conclusion was this: The Watts family was able to build boats in Collingwood for so long because they were good at what they did.  At a time when many Irish immigrants were destitute and struggling to stay alive, building Canada’s railways and canals, the Watts family set out on its own and established a business that earned the family a respected place in Canada’s marine history.

I can assure you that I am not attempting to argue that the Shaws are icons of Canadian history, but I would like to suggest that, like the Watts family, they were exceptionally good at what they did, and that it’s no coincidence the Shaws have been farming the land atop Blue Mountain for the past 163 years.   (more…)

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For the past two weeks (okay, possibly four), I have postponed my weekly entries in an attempt to discover the plausibility of the question I posed in my last post: Might Thomas have arrived in New York, and then ventured across Lake Ontario to Toronto in 1847?

According to historian Mark. G. McGowan, 38 560 refugees arrived in Toronto’s harbour in 1847, 75% of whom were Irish.   For Toronto’s then population of  20 000, Ireland’s mass exodus introduced significant health and socio-economic challenges that resulted in less than favourable opinions of the Irish. Many regarded the Irish as a diseased people who were dependent on the goodwill, and economy, of the citizens of their port of arrival.  (more…)

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I am pleased to announce that this is the final post that will directly address the historical events recorded by Lorne Shaw and J.T. MacMurchy in “The Shaws of Nearby Banks”.   While I have enjoyed interacting with MacMurchy’s text, I am extremely excited to explore the unpublished histories of the Shaws, and their time spent in Ireland, Banks, and beyond.

In “The Shaw Family of Nearby Banks”, MacMurchy devotes two very brief sentences to the first generation of Canadian-born Shaws.  Both sentences appear under the simple subheading “Large Family”, and are introduced by a statement that reads like a disclaimer, or a warning of what’s to come: “The people who opened this country had large families.”  Thomas and Isabella were no exception.

Together, Thomas and Isabella are known to have raised ten children: “James, Thomas, Andrew, Sam, Isabelle (Mrs. Thomas Carscadden), Mary (Mrs. John Carscadden), Robert, William, Edward and David.”  I recently learned from my grandfather’s brother, Ian Shaw, that Thomas and Isabella may have had another child named John, who lived to be eight months old (b. 24 January 1849, d. 3 October 1849).  If anyone has located John’s birth or death certificates I would be most grateful to receive a copy as I have been unable to confirm his connection to the family.

The following photograph is believed to have been taken circa 1901, prior to Thomas’s and Isabella’s return to Ireland for a six month visit with family and friends.  According to Uncle Ian, the return trip was paid for by their children, and their departure was the occasion for this impressive photograph.   To my knowledge, this is the only photograph of Thomas, Isabella, and their children.  If you know of another, please forward it to me and I will happily post it alongside the photograph below.

Thomas Shaw Sr. and Isabella Jordan Family, c1901

The Shaw Family, c1901
Back Row (left to right): James, Thomas, Isabella (Shaw) Carscadden, Samuel, Robert, Andrew
Middle Row (left to right): Thomas Shaw Sr., Isabella Shaw (granddaughter), Isabella (Jordan) Shaw
Front Row (left to right): William, Mary (Shaw) Carscadden, Edward

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